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Thread: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

  1. #21

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    For most programs playing without live crowds is a bigger financial loss than not playing at all

  2. #22

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by BravesBrownsGS View Post
    For most programs playing without live crowds is a bigger financial loss than not playing at all
    You're probably right and a lot of schools will run the numbers and make a decision. I'm wondering if TV alone is enough to support anybody.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Even if you have say, 60 schools play while 70 sit out. What do you do with the scheduling? What if 60 teams start but 15 drop out over the course of the season? I don't think fanless CFB is an option.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by BravesBrownsGS View Post
    For most programs playing without live crowds is a bigger financial loss than not playing at all
    I doubt that.
    Here's ballpark numbers for Georgia Southern.

    We get around $500k as our share of the Sun Belt TV agreement.
    We get over a million per school from the Sun Belt's share of CFP money
    I'll guess we net $500k for the Ole Miss trip.

    I believe in one of TK's letters he said the whole department spends about $1.4 million on travel. I'll be liberal and assume football is half of that ($700k) even though it's probably less. On the other hand you lose about 2/3 of ticket revenue around $1 million in ticket revenue.

    With the huge amounts of money P5s get from their TV networks and from CFP payouts I doubt most of them lose money unless they're among the few with the very highest ticket revenues.

    And of course you're presumably pay for scholarships whether the players are playing or not.
    "Follow the trendlines, not the headlines." -Steven Pinker (?)

    Regarding football Scheduling.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Big Frank tweeted the other day, UGA gets like $150M of their $170M budget from football. Same goes for the Duke's and Kentucky's of college basketball. The NCAA distributes $800M from March Madness through shares (how far you go + how far your conference mates go) on a rolling period, forgot how many years. This years distribution is expected to be like $200M.
    No longer eating crow for saying "The TO is gone get over it!!"

  6. #26

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rad View Post
    At this point "no crowds" is more likely than "no football." Abbott Labs just came out with a cheap, fast serum antibody test for COVID-19, so in a few weeks the coaches can test everybody to see who is safely past the exposure to this virus. However, experts might say that does not apply to large crowds that would include people who are at risk because they are not immune yet and have vape-damaged lungs or whatever (nobody is mentioning that, BTW. How much sub-clinical damage to young lungs is out there???).

    So, just a guess at this point, we could be playing to TV audiences. It's hard for me to see herd immunity (which requires large scale vaccination) before the 2021 season.

    Not to be 'that guy' but the Abbott test is actually a molecular test and not an antibody serum test. The reason I make that point is because the RNA replication is far more sensitive and the early returns on their #'s show 100% sensitivity.

    A lot of folks have been lambasted over why we haven't used other tests available in the UK and elsewhere ... and the bottom line answer is that the FDA has drawn the line on making sure they approve tests with appropriate sensitivity and specificity.

    6 years ago, most of the flu kits on the market were crap .... with about a 50% sensitivity ... i.e. doctors in bad flu seasons would treat to symptoms and not even order tests. Now, with molecular testing (and amplification techniques) the specificity is near absolute as is the sensitivity. Fluorescent antibody tests are much better than the kits in use previously, but even they don't compare to molecular results.

    Also, don't get me started on staff in doctor's offices eye-reading kits that are solely meant to be read by instrumentation. There are a lot of gaps in testing and every step, from the pre-analytical collection phase to resulting is important to ensure a proper result.
    “Gentlemen, we will chase perfection, and we will chase it relentlessly, knowing all the while we can never attain it. But along the way, we shall catch excellence.” ― Vince Lombardi Jr.





  7. #27

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Thanks for the correction! By 100% sensitivity do you mean...100% accuracy in telling who has antibodies? Something else?

  8. #28

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rad View Post
    Thanks for the correction! By 100% sensitivity do you mean...100% accuracy in telling who has antibodies? Something else?
    It means they have not had any false negatives (i.e. anyone who has the infection and the test says they don't).
    "Follow the trendlines, not the headlines." -Steven Pinker (?)

    Regarding football Scheduling.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    m

  10. #30

    Default Re: Health Care Worker / First Responder Appreciation Day?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle22 View Post
    Not to be 'that guy' but the Abbott test is actually a molecular test and not an antibody serum test. The reason I make that point is because the RNA replication is far more sensitive and the early returns on their #'s show 100% sensitivity.

    A lot of folks have been lambasted over why we haven't used other tests available in the UK and elsewhere ... and the bottom line answer is that the FDA has drawn the line on making sure they approve tests with appropriate sensitivity and specificity.

    6 years ago, most of the flu kits on the market were crap .... with about a 50% sensitivity ... i.e. doctors in bad flu seasons would treat to symptoms and not even order tests. Now, with molecular testing (and amplification techniques) the specificity is near absolute as is the sensitivity. Fluorescent antibody tests are much better than the kits in use previously, but even they don't compare to molecular results.

    Also, don't get me started on staff in doctor's offices eye-reading kits that are solely meant to be read by instrumentation. There are a lot of gaps in testing and every step, from the pre-analytical collection phase to resulting is important to ensure a proper result.
    You go, Deuces! I love it when you talk shop!
    Sincerely,
    Irwin M. Fletcher

    P.S.: Have a nice day!

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